Event Details

Fergal Keane in Conversation

Date/time:
Sat 28th October 2017
7.30pm - 8.30pm
Venue:
Stratford Artshouse
Price:
£14

Why will people kill for a cause? How does the act of killing reverberate through generations? The award-winning BBC Foreign Correspondent discusses a family story of murder, blood and betrayal that tore a town apart, and investigates events of the Irish civil war; his family’s role in this fratricidal conflict and the scars left by bloody conflict, wherever it occurs.
 
His latest book, Wounds, is both memoir and history set during years of bitter conflict in rural West Ireland during the 1920s and primarily the story of Fergal Keane’s grandmother, who was an IRA guerrilla, and of her brother Mick and his friend Con Brosnan and how they took up guns to fight the British Empire. Talking from both a personal and historical point of view, he will discuss their experiences and those of many Irishmen and women like them, to explain why he has spent much of his life trying to understand war and hatred.

Fergal Keane OBE joined the BBC in 1989 as Northern Ireland Correspondent, but in August 1990 he was appointed their Southern African Correspondent covering the township unrest in South Africa, the first multi-racial elections following the end of apartheid, and the genocide in Rwanda. In 1995 he was appointed Asia Correspondent based in Hong Kong and two years later, after the handover, he returned to be based in the BBC’s World Affairs Unit in London.

Keane was named as overall winner of the Amnesty International Press Awards in 1993 and won an Amnesty television prize in 1994 for his investigation of the Rwandan genocide, Journey Into Darkness. He is the only journalist to have won both the Royal Television Society Journalist of the Year award and the Sony Radio Reporter of the Year in the same year – 1994. He won The Voice of The Viewer award and a Listener Award for his 1996 BBC Radio 4 From Our Own Correspondant despatch Letter to Daniel, addressed to his newborn son, and a One World Television Award in 1999. He won a BAFTA award for his documentary on Rwanda, Valentina’s Story. He has won the James Cameron Prize for war reporting, the Edward R. Murrow Award for foreign reporting, the Index on Censorship prize for journalistic integrity, and the 1995 Orwell Prize for his book Season of Blood. He won a Sony Gold Award for his Radio 4 series Taking A Stand.

In 2005, Keane helped to found the UK-based Third World development agency Msaada, which assists survivors of the Rwandan Genocide. and in 2010, he published his first history work Road of Bones: the Siege of Kohima 1944, an account of the epic battle which halted the Japanese invasion of India in 1944. Keane has been awarded honorary degrees in literature from the University of Strathclyde, Bournemouth University and Staffordshire University. On 15 December 2011, he received an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Liverpool. Keane was appointed an OBE for services to journalism in the 1997 New Year’s Honours list.

Book by calling the Box Office on 01789 207100 (Open 10am til 4pm Mon-Fri, 9.30am-2pm Sat, 9.30-1pm Sun) or book online here 

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